Related Books

This is a list which will grow over time… Eventually, I guess the aim will be to provide a review for each of them.

  • Agar-Hamilton & Turner ‘The Sidi Rezegh Battles’
    Official South African history
  • Carver ‘Dilemmas of the Desert War’
    Analysis of why Ritchie was not as bad as he is usually portrayed.
  • Carver ‘Tobruk’
    Standard work on the battles for Tobruk, leading up to its fall.
  • Clifton ‘The Happy Hunted’
    Biography by NZ Brigadier Clifton who was in charge of the Royal Engineers during the battle
  • Cocchia ‘Convoglio’
    Cocchia was an Italian escort commander, and later head of the USMM (historical office of the Italian Navy)
  • Crisp ‘Brazen Chariots’
    A must read – Crisp was a troop (platoon) commander in 3 RTR
  • Greene/Massignani ‘Rommel in Africa Settentrionale’
    Overview of the campaign with a focus on the Italian side, but not without flaws.
  • Hargest ‘Farewell Campo 18′
    NZ Brigadier Hargest was captured when 5th Brigade HQ was overrun, and evacuated from Bardia by submarine. He escaped through Switzerland and France, and was eventually killed in Normandy, while acting as observer to the British forces there.
  • Hinsley ‘British Intelligence in World War 2′ Vol. II
    Standard work, including a lot of interesting information on ULTRA and the Y (radio intercept) services.
  • Joly ‘Take these Men’
    A superb semi-fictional account of armoured war in the desert.
  • Kippenberger ‘Infantry Brigadier’
    NZ Brigadier Kippenberger was badly wounded on Belhamed.
  • Kriebel/Gudmundsson ‘Inside the Afrika Korps’
    Kriebel was Operations Officer of 15th Panzer, and wrote this in captivity.
  • Loi ‘Aggredisci e Vincerai’
    History of  Trieste division. Not without its flaws.
  • Mas – ‘Afrika Korps’ Tome I and Tome II (Tome I reviewed here)
    Very good overview of the campaign in French, with a lot of research evident and a great collection of photos.
  • Montanari ‘Tobruk’
    Italian official history ground and air
  • National Archives ‘Special Forces in the Desert War 1940 – 43′
    Reprint of two reports produced shortly after the war.
  • Playfair ‘The Med and The Middle East’
    British official history
  • Pope, Dudley ‘Flag 4′ on coastal forces in the Med, not directly relevant to the topic of CRUSADER, but a good book.
  • Santoni ‘Il Vero Tradittore’
    The role of ULTRA in the Mediterranean uncovered
  • Smith, P. and Walker, E. ‘Battles of the Malta Striking Forces’
    Anything by Peter is worth reading. This one deals in particular with Force K (see also my book review at this link)
  • USMM ‘La Difesa del Trafico’
    Vol. 7 of the Italian official navy history
  • Terraine ‘The Right of the Line’, a one-volume history of the RAF in Europe and the Med.
  • Smith, Peter ‘Fighting Flotilla’, on the development and fate of the ‘L’ class destroyers which featured so prominently during Crusader (HMS Lance and Lively of Force K). See also book review at this link.

11 thoughts on “Related Books

  1. I like to know when you book will come out.

    I interested to know exact make by type and number of tanks assigned to 7 th Armoured Bde -7Armoured Divsion at start of Operation Crusader
    A9?
    A10??
    A13?/
    Crusaders??

    Second i like to know what happen to 35 M3 stuart of 4 th Armoured Bde captured by Africa Corps early in the Operation Cruader battle? I read some were recaptured and used by 2 New Zealand Divison’s Cavalry regiment later in the battle?

    Ken Griffin
    Houston Texas

    • Dear Ken

      There is no date at present. Regarding your questions, based on the report by 7th Armoured Brigade after the operation, the total number of tanks were 129, of which 26 were Cruiser Mk. II (A10), and at least 16 were Cruiser Mk. IV (A13 Mk.II). There were also Crusaders (A15 or Cruiser Mk. V), but at the moment I can not tell how many. You maybe interested in this combat report. I doubt there were

      Regarding your second question, nine of these tanks were quickly recaptured by the New Zealanders (the combat report by 6 New Zealand Brigade mentions this, you can look it up here), and a few were used by the Germans as well. The recaptured tanks were crewed by the tank battalion attached to 6 New Zealand Brigade (8 RTR), not the Divisional Cavalry (although they may have separately recaptured more M3s).

      I seriously doubt any made it in German service beyond the retreat from Tobruk. I believe that the M3s used by the Kampfstaffel in 1942 were in the first instance captured in late 1941 or early 1942.

      Given your interest in 7 Armoured Brigade you might be interested in this war diary transcription?

      I hope this helps a bit.

      All the best

      Andreas

  2. Thanks Andreas for prompt response and links.

    I continue to research the questions on my own and post any new information i iuncover on this blog.

    Take Care Thanks again Ken

    • Hi Ken

      My pleasure, and sorry that I do not have more info for you at the moment. You have seen the latest post as well I hope.

      I’ll keep a look-out for this info now and will let you know when I come across something.

      All the best

      Andreas

  3. Andreas i just received a great book via interlibary loan on Operation Crusader

    ISBN: 9780850522846

    Crusader: Eighth Army’s Forgotten Victory, November 1941 to January 1942

    Richard Humble stated 7th Armoured Bde had 71 A13 and 25 A10 operational at beginning of Operation Crusader. he also state that Orginally 7th Arm Bde had 165 tank but lost lost lost them to Mechanical failure so it only have 119 tank when it cross the wire so to speak. Andreas are you familir and read this book, It was published in mid 1980.

    I also going to pick up Osprey new book on Operation Crusader. I give you report on it next week

    • Hi Ken

      I have that book. It is quite good actually, despite some errors, but strongly focussed on the British side.

      I doubt however that 7th Armoured had 165. That would be the standard number of tanks in a Brigade at that time of the war I believe, and I guess that is why Mr. Humble assumed that’s what they had. Their AAR (after action report) states they started with 129, and when they had crossed the wire they had 119 left I think, which indicates mechanical failures of their clapped out machines, as well as reliability issues with the new Crusaders.

      All the best

      Andreas

  4. I just finshing reading Ken Ford opsrey book Operation Crusader. I well illustrated book and good text,

    However i like to confirm or revise MR Ford following statement on 7 th Armored Bde and 32 Tank Bde Order of battle at start fo OPeration Crusader

    Mr Ford stated the followig

    8th Army had 477 tank at start of Operation Crudsader
    32 early crusiers A10 A9
    62 Cruisers A13
    210 Crusaders
    173 M3 Stuarts

    Also 32Tk BDe has
    32 Cruisers
    25 M3 Stuart first i heard that they had them

    Ford Book has great maps and current shot of battlefield

    • Hi Ken

      Thanks for the comment. He is certainly wrong in Stuarts in 32nd Army Tank Brigade. Might be a confusion with their light tanks, which were probably Vickers Mk. VI.

      I have posted 8th Army’s tank numbers recently and his are understating things. E.g. He forgets 1st Army Tank Brigade with its three regiments of Matildas and Valentines.

      All the best

      Andreas

  5. Thanks Andeas

    Andreas i just received a great book via interlibary loan on Operation Crusader

    ISBN: 9780850522846

    Crusader: Eighth Army’s Forgotten Victory, November 1941 to January 1942

    Richard Humble stated 7th Armoured Bde had 71 A13 and 25 A10 operational at beginning of Operation Crusader. he also state that Orginally 7th Arm Bde had 165 tank but lost lost lost them to Mechanical failure so it only have 119 tank when it cross the wire so to speak. Andreas are you familir and read this book, It was published in mid 1980

    Have you read Richard Humble book Crusader Eighth Army forgotten victory ?

    Thanks again
    Ken

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